Just Sayin’ : Books by Librarians/Information Professionals are Quinntessential Examples of User-Generated Content


While the headline isn’t true for all titles authored by librarians (and info pros), I believe it holds true when the topics involved are those that need to be experimented with, and then reported on. For example, Terry Ballard, systems librarian at the Mendik Law Library (NYC) has a new book about his experiences with all things Google. Terry’s recently published Google This! includes his (and other librarians’) use of Google to enhance social media. But, as you can readily see, Terry had to use the tools before he could generate the content. The same is true of my book UContent — Iit was necessary for me to experiment with each form of user-generated content before I could record my results. Certainly, books such as Peter Jacso’s Build Your Own Database and Ran Hock’s Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook (in its 3rd edition) possibly only come about because the authors have worked extensively in the subject areas before they “generated” the books.


Crowdsourcing & Prudential Retirement Services



My newest interest is monitoring the way companies get the general public to boost company esteem and give it a higher “kinder” profile (an example of Crowdsourcing). The other night I saw a television ad for Prudential’s retirement services. It was a gentle reminder for people on the cusp of retirement to “get their acts together” and turn to Prudential for retirement planning. But, taking a page from the Tiffany (jewelry) “Love is Everywhere” (people place hearts on a map where they fell in love), Prudential wants retirees to tell their stories of their first day in retirement.

So… individuals, in their spare time, “work” for Prudential. See the Day One Stories page.


Just Sayin’ : Books by Librarians/Information Professionals are Quinntessential Examples of User-Generated Content


While the headline isn’t true for all titles authored by librarians (and info pros), I believe it holds true when the topics involved are those that need to be experimented with, and then reported on. For example, Terry Ballard, systems librarian at the Mendik Law Library (NYC) has a new book about his experiences with all things Google. Terry’s recently published Google This! includes his (and other librarians’) use of Google to enhance social media. But, as you can readily see, Terry had to use the tools before he could generate the content. The same is true of my book UContent — Iit was necessary for me to experiment with each form of user-generated content before I could record my results. Certainly, books such as Peter Jacso’s Build Your Own Database and Ran Hock’s Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook (in its 3rd edition) possibly only come about because the authors have worked extensively in the subject areas before they “generated” the books.


More Crowdsourcing


More Crowdsourcing


adding a sound file that is now hosted at the internet archive


To take advantage of the free hosting feature of the Internet Archive, I have saved this file at the IA


the national jukebox … have a listen …


Critics, including myself, of the extension of copyright that resulted from the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998 (a law that extended copyright to last for the life of the author plus 70 years), should be elated by the recent arrival of a new treasury of streaming audio offered by the Library of Congress. Called “The National Jukebox,” LOC launched access to this collection of over 10,000 sound recordings in May 2011.

Although the works in the collection would seem to be in the public domain (the materials date from 1901 to 1925) they are still copyrighted, because rights to sound recordings differ from those for books and sheet music; you can listen to the recordings, but you may not make copies. Nonetheless, the Sony Music Corporation granted LOC a “gratis license” to use the recordings, and even helped the Library digitize the master recordings. The license enables the mass distribution of these recordings as streaming sound files, and though the files cannot be downloaded, you may embed them on your website or store them in playlists.

Here is a link to a baseball oriented playlist I made at the Jukebox.


hilarious images from Google Books


I happen to be in the midst of writing a chapter on self-publishing which, of course, necessitates rummaging around the Web for information. I came upon this blog post by Morris Rosenthal. Take a look at it because it may be a harbinger of things to come.