Just Sayin’ : Books by Librarians/Information Professionals are Quinntessential Examples of User-Generated Content


While the headline isn’t true for all titles authored by librarians (and info pros), I believe it holds true when the topics involved are those that need to be experimented with, and then reported on. For example, Terry Ballard, systems librarian at the Mendik Law Library (NYC) has a new book about his experiences with all things Google. Terry’s recently published Google This! includes his (and other librarians’) use of Google to enhance social media. But, as you can readily see, Terry had to use the tools before he could generate the content. The same is true of my book UContent — Iit was necessary for me to experiment with each form of user-generated content before I could record my results. Certainly, books such as Peter Jacso’s Build Your Own Database and Ran Hock’s Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook (in its 3rd edition) possibly only come about because the authors have worked extensively in the subject areas before they “generated” the books.


Self Publishing Portal from Project Gutenberg


In UContent’s chapter on Project Gutenberg (aka PG) I focused on the procedure the user must follow to contribute content to Gutenberg’s large depository of works in the public domain. The contributed content, however, is rarely the original work of the contributor.Image

Barbara Quint recently reported PG has expanded its role, and launched its portal for

user-generated content (self-published works). PG’s “Self-Publishing Portal” went public on July 4, 2012.

Self-published authors are able to upload their works as PDFs (or MP3s for spoken word), and share them. Moreover, authors retain all rights (e.g., they may withdraw their works if, for instance, a commercial publisher takes an interest) and, of course, true to PG’s generous mission, the authors can use the Portal for free. As of today the Portal has 693 works.


Web expert builds Google Custom Search Engine to help all of us


Tara Calishain, creator of Research Buzz, announced her iteration of a Google Search Engine designed to search the web sites of the 50 United States. Tara must’ve spent some time, energy, and expertise, because it works like a charm. Her Custom Search Engine is another example of an end-user building a utility to help others navigate the Web infrastructure.

I covered this extensively in chapter 11 of my book UContent (2012) — check out my Custom Search Engine chapter links here.

Thanks Tara!


Crowdsourcing & Prudential Retirement Services



My newest interest is monitoring the way companies get the general public to boost company esteem and give it a higher “kinder” profile (an example of Crowdsourcing). The other night I saw a television ad for Prudential’s retirement services. It was a gentle reminder for people on the cusp of retirement to “get their acts together” and turn to Prudential for retirement planning. But, taking a page from the Tiffany (jewelry) “Love is Everywhere” (people place hearts on a map where they fell in love), Prudential wants retirees to tell their stories of their first day in retirement.

So… individuals, in their spare time, “work” for Prudential. See the Day One Stories page.


Nice infographic on UGC in various countries. Interview, too!


Jimena Urquijo, the VP Business Development of Kantar Media-TGI Latina, is interviewed on the importance of UGC and eWOM (electronic Word Of Mouth) in Latin America. Seems UGC is far from dead, but evolving in Latin America where the number of readers of UGC is surpassing the number in Germany and Great Britain.

Here’s the interview and infographic.


Just Sayin’ : Books by Librarians/Information Professionals are Quinntessential Examples of User-Generated Content


While the headline isn’t true for all titles authored by librarians (and info pros), I believe it holds true when the topics involved are those that need to be experimented with, and then reported on. For example, Terry Ballard, systems librarian at the Mendik Law Library (NYC) has a new book about his experiences with all things Google. Terry’s recently published Google This! includes his (and other librarians’) use of Google to enhance social media. But, as you can readily see, Terry had to use the tools before he could generate the content. The same is true of my book UContent — Iit was necessary for me to experiment with each form of user-generated content before I could record my results. Certainly, books such as Peter Jacso’s Build Your Own Database and Ran Hock’s Extreme Searcher’s Internet Handbook (in its 3rd edition) possibly only come about because the authors have worked extensively in the subject areas before they “generated” the books.


More Crowdsourcing


More Crowdsourcing


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